Bum Glue and the Devil Cat

Posted by on Feb 11, 2008 in Writing | 2 comments

devil-cat.jpgThis morning — resolute and annoyed — I stepped over drifts of shredded toilet paper and into my office. I would not let the mess distract me from my writing duties. I could clean the mess any old time; let it sit for awhile; let the devil cat from toilet paper hell have yet more fun with his kill if he desired.

I caught him in act last night. He woke me up. Yes, I laughed.

But this morning, giggles were beside the point. I mustn’t, I told myself, clean and vacuum; not yet. I could feel the procrastination mistress within, ever distractible she is, perking up at the thought of not turning on my laptop, not starting chapter 19, not settling into anything except the next chore or trip to the fridge.

I was reminded of a lesson from Write Away, One Novelist’s Approach to Fiction and the Writing Life, by Elizabeth George. She mentions “bum glue,” a little something we writers must possess to keep our bums stuck to our chairs and in front of our writing implements. Ms. George quotes from one of her own journals:

…I suit up and show up. I sit down at the computer and I do the work, moving it forward a sentence at a time, which is ultimately the only way there is to write a book.

sleepy-cat.jpgAs of this moment (4:00 p.m.) the toilet paper is still adrift in the hallway. Amazing how big it gets when off the roll and shredded to bits. It’s the popcorn effect. But that’s okay, because I wrote my pages.

(By the way, I grabbed this shot just before I turned on the computer this morning. Looks like mauling the toilet paper tuckered the poor dude out, doesn’t it? Rough life.)

2 Comments

  1. It’s 4:20 p.m. and Devil Cat just ripped open the lap desk you see him sleeping on in the second photo. I kid you not. Now there’s little plastic stuffing balls all over the place to go with the shredded toilet paper.

    I suppose I really do have to clean now. Bummer.

  2. Boy, and I thought my cat was bad!

    I listened to a Richard Ford lecture in which his writing advice was “Stay and stay and stay and stay and stay.” So simple and true. And so damn hard.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *