It Is What It Is

Posted by on Nov 24, 2008 in Writing | 11 comments

Sunshine picture for a sunnier perspective:

sunshinepicture

I’ll admit, I’m still unsettled by last week’s setback. My energy’s low. I want to take lots of walks, which is a sure sign that I’m melancholic. It’s not about the agent mishap. Not really. That was a trigger for other thoughts. The bigger thoughts about my life, the writing, what’s going to become of me, and so on. You probably know how that goes — pretty common, I’d guess.

However, one thing about me: I have a knack for stepping outside myself at the same time I’m falling into mini-funks. The detachment doesn’t diminish the funks, only allows me to see them for what they are: transitory.

Can anyone else relate to this?

So, yes, I’m in a mini-funk. I see the funk. I accept the funk. And the funk is what it is. Over the next week or two I’ll probably be doing a lot of thinking (not always beneficial!).

sunshinepicture2

Meanwhile, though distracted and unmotivated, I’m working anyhow. I’m reading through the manuscript that I’d worked on with Erstwhile Agent, trying not to dwell on all the ways the first 25 pages I’d changed per her suggestions (to speed up the beginning) don’t feel right.

Meanwhile, two quotes I’m liking at the moment. I wrote this one out large on several sheets of paper and taped it to the wall beside my bed:

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it. (Thomas Jefferson)

This quote reminds me to quit with all the thinking already!

Our “original mind” includes everything within itself. It is alwasy rich and sufficient within itself. This does not mean a closed mind, but actually an empty mind and a ready mind. If your mind is empty, it is always ready for anything. It is open to everything. (Shunryu Suzuki-roshi)

11 Comments

  1. Hi Lisa, thanks for popping by my blog. I’ve enjoyed a couple of your posts & now I must say that writing truly can bring on the biggest ups and the lowest lows. It’s a tough, tough business and wonderful all at the same time. Keep at it. I know so very many published authors who have absolutely horrific agent stories (myself included!) so one day you’ll be sitting around talking about these days and thinking about how your previous agent actually did you a favor because you went elsewhere and became successful 🙂

  2. Thanks so much for the words of support, Wendy. I appreciate the perspectives of working novelists. Inspirational. Too bad I’m Debbie Downer during your first visit to my blog though! Hah!

  3. Good approach to the agent problem, Lisa.

    Funny, I just finished rereading “The Watercourse Way” by Alan Watts. LOL!

  4. You are so strong! When I’m in a funk, I’m really in a funk. You will come out of this better and stronger.

  5. Lisa, I understand. I had an unpleasant business relationship with a gallery owner that burned me from working with other galleries for over 2 years. I simply shriveled up. I am so glad that you are pushing forward.

    ~Lavanna

  6. Hi Kathryn — I’ll have to check out the book. I’ve never read it. Happy Tday!

    Caroline, hi there…Don’t feel so strong, feel wayward, in fact. Thanks for the vote though!

    Lavanna — shrivel up, that’s a great way to put it! Just call my prune face (for the moment)!

  7. I think it’s actually pretty wonderful that you are able to step outside yourself this way. I tend to go too internal, too deep down in there, which feels a lot like wallowing for just the sake of wallowing. I like your way better.

    I hope the funk passes soon. And I hope you had a good Thanksgiving.

  8. A break is good. Nourishing. (so is turkey and stuffing and real cranberry.)

    Love that you posted your quotes on your wall. Excellent idea. Nice picture, too, of the people squatting in the park. Great light.

    We buy candles from an old hippie on a mountain. He always says, as you’re leaving the store, “enjoy the light.”

    And to you, too, enjoy the light and when you get back to your writing, you’ll be ready and it will be ready.

  9. Hi nova, I sometimes wonder how healthy my detachment is…I think there must be a balance between detachment and “wallowing,” as you call it. (I like your wallowing — you write about your inner-workings so well!)

    Thank you, oh. I’ve gotta watch myself — I could overrun my home with quotes! I’m going to give a spiritual novel called “The Shack” a try in hopes for a little spiritual light. Have you heard of this one? Making the word-of-mouth rounds the way “The Celestine Prophesy” did years ago. We’ll see!

  10. Ohhhhh, Lisa, I’m so sorry this happened to you! But it’s true what Wendy Roberts said above; the Horrible Agent story happens to too many of us…and not to go all Pollyanna on you or anything, but I’ll bet you anything that Erstwhile Agent leaving is going to turn out to be the best thing that ever happened to your career! A disinterested agent is sooo toxic for the success of a book–and I have a good feeling about Nice Agent, or a reasonable substitute showing up soon and rescuing this book! In the meantime, though, it’s good to just feel all this stuff–and then you’ll realize you feel like working again. Take care of yourself, and eat a lot of turkey leftovers! And pie! You can’t go wrong with pie.

  11. Thank you, Sandi, I appreciate the Pollyanna. I need a little Pollyanna!

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